World's longest Lego bridge visits Melbourne

The record-breaking bridge is touring the world, making its latest stop in Australia.

ICE
ICE's Lego Bridge.
A Guinness World Record-breaking bridge made entirely out of Lego, originally unveiled in London, is on its way to Victoria, Australia, to inspire a new generation of students to take up a career in engineering.

The bridge stands over 3m tall and spans almost the equivalent of 2 D-class trams parked end to end, and is made of more than 200,000 individual plastic Lego bricks.
 

Designed by world-renowned bridge engineer and ICE Fellow Dr Robin Sham CBE, the bridge was first displayed in London in 2016 and set a Guinness World Record for the longest span bridge made of Lego bricks.

   

Connecting engineers to the public

Monash University, Melbourne, together with ICE, Victoria innovation agency Veski, UK Department for International Trade and the office of the Chief Engineer of Victoria, will be showcasing the bridge at the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre (MSAC) in March.

Anthony Bennett, ICE Victoria and Tasmania Representative, said: "Bridges connect people, places and communities. ICE’s visionary Lego Bridge project connects engineers with the public, demonstrating the monumental accomplishments of engineering.

"Using only the materials that you'd find in a child’s Lego toy box, we hope to showcase the extraordinary feats of engineers and inspire the youth of Victoria to see that engineering is a creative, rewarding and fun career.” 

A multi-disciplinary team of students from the Monash Industry Team Initiative (MITI) assembled the bridge locally under the supervision of engineering staff from Monash University. 

MITI offers a unique opportunity to form an effective collaboration between leading Australian and global industry partners and multi-disciplinary student teams from Monash University. These MITI student teams collaborate and design innovative solutions to real issues in today's business world.

The bridge will be on display at the MSAC as part of the F1 Grand Prix celebrations and was open to the general public this week. 

The bridge will be further showcased later this year at multiple events ahead of the World Engineering Congress (WEC) and the celebration of Engineers Australia’s 100th anniversary.
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