CLOCS and designers: reducing the risk from construction vehicles

This guidance discusses the approach that designers should take to include planning for resource and vehicle movements for a construction site, to reduce impact on the local community.

Planning for safe construction vehicle movement is an essential part of the design process.
Planning for safe construction vehicle movement is an essential part of the design process.

In 2018, 5,517 pedestrians, pedal cyclists and motorcyclists were killed or injured in collisions with goods vehicles commonly used in construction on roads across the whole of Great Britain - with only 55% in urban areas.

Half of the fatal or serious injury incidents involving heavy goods vehicles were likely construction-specific (cement mixers, tippers etc.). Numbers will inevitably double or worse as the essential growth of active travel takes effect, which is needed to help to reduce population ill-health, emissions and congestion. The trauma of each collision indelibly affects many others, too - the family, driver, witnesses and first responders.

Clearly, there is a problem – HGVs are consistently killing and seriously injuring more than 10 pedestrians, cyclists and motorcyclists per week. This is a known and persistent fact in the construction industry, and under CDM 2015, designers have a duty to reduce foreseeable risk.

There is a pressing need to regulate the impact of construction vehicles on UK roads, and prioritising safety on all infrastructure projects should be paramount to the design process.

This guidance discusses the approach that designers should take when developing their designs to include planning for resource and vehicle movements for a construction site to reduce its impact on the road network and local community.

This document was produced in collaboration with expert input from ICE’s Safety, Health & Wellbeing and Walking & Cycling Communities of Practice.

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